Electricity Infused Bandage for Better Wound Treatment

A new concept of electrifying wound care is slowly emerging in healthcare industry. In the past few years, researchers have clearly not understood the utility of electricity infused bandages. Moreover, the concept of faster wound healing using electrical bandages was itself very vague to them. However, recently The Ohio State University’s team has discovered a new path of understanding the science behind these electrical bandages. This raises hopes for better wound treatment and faster healing.

The new study on electrifying wound care confirms the bandages belong to a class of therapy electroceuticals.  Devices use electrical impulses for treating various medical complexities such as wounds. Such electroceutical bandages are highly potential to kill wound surrounding bacteria, allows faster healing of wounds. However, the researchers are now curious to know if these electroceutical treatments work similarly to heal chronic wounds or not. They also want to understand the mechanism behind these electroceutical treatments to kill bacteria.

Bandage and Electric Current Produce Antimicrobial Chemical- Hypochlorous Acid

To satisfy such quest, Ohio State University’s team has developed a new model to learn more about the functionality of electroceutical bandages. The team used haboti silk, bacteria-laden biofilm, and electrified bandage to conduct an experiment on this. The outcome was immensely satisfying when the team observed no existence of bacteria after applying electrified bandage to bacteria-laden biofilm. They found such bandages made of proper materials which broke the protective barrier of wound causing bacteria.

During the experiment, the research team used electron microscope for monitoring bacterial activities. They noticed that the electric current disrupted the barrier of the biofilm and started destroying bacteria.

However this in-vitro experiment has given a clear idea to the scientists about the biofilms’ working principles. This fundamental understanding would help in improving the design of electroceutical bandages for providing better wound treatment in the future.

%d bloggers like this: