Body Temperature Key to Fighting Infections and Tumors, says Study

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A recent research study conducted at the University of Warwick has adjudged that hotter bodies are more efficient in fighting infections, wounds, and tumors. The study had asserted that bodies with hotter temperatures have a speedy defense mechanism and counters slight escalation in temperature and inflammations such as fever in a much stronger manner than otherwise.

It was detected that inflammatory signals prompt NF-kB proteins as a manner of ticking clock, with the specific proteins moving forwards and backwards as well as in and out of the cell nucleus, switching genes off and on in the process. In cases wherein NF-kB is not controlled, it can lead to inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn’s disease. In a body at temperature overs 34 degrees, the clock of NF-kB slows down and gains speed over 40 degrees.

The mathematicians have calculated how temperatures increase and have predicted that a certain protein called as A20 may be utterly critical for the processes. The researchers managed to extract A20 from cells and noted that the NF-kB clock failed to clock its sensitivity as the temperatures increased.

The research has been a result of a collaboration of experts from multiple disciplines, including biologists and mathematicians from the Universities of Manchester and Warwick. The group of researchers has hoped that this new findings will help in devising more effective and efficient drugs that will target exact protein for the recovery process. It has been revealed that low body temperatures during sleeping hours may provide for fascinating explanation on how shift works, jet lag occurs, or sleep disorders expand.

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